Knowing is Not Enough

It relieved me somewhat to learn that in alcoholics the will is amazingly weakened when it comes to combating liquor, though it often remains strong in other respects. My incredible behavior in the face of a desperate desire to stop was explained. Understanding myself now, I fared forth in high hope. For three for four months the goose hung high. I went to town regularly and even made a little money. Surely this was the answer – self-knowledge.   

But it was not, for the frightful day came when I drank once more. The curve of my declining moral and bodily health fell off like a ski-jump.  (Alcoholics Anonymous pg. 7)

At this point in history there seems to be an endless flow of information on recovery.  There are Twelve Step, Anti-Twelve Step, similar to Twelve Step, holistic and on and on.  Not to say that any of this is good or bad but, there is so much more to recovery than information.

That may be true of certain nonalcoholic people who, though drinking foolishly and heavily at the present time, are able to stop or moderate, because their brains and bodies have not been damaged as ours were.  But the actual or potential alcoholic, with hardly an exception, will be absolutely unable to stop drinking on the basis of self-knowledge. This is a point we wish to emphasize and re-emphasize, to smash home upon our alcoholic readers as it has been revealed to us out of bitter experience.  (Alcoholic Anonymous pg. 39)

No amount of “knowing” will keep a person sober.  INFORMATION WILL NOT KEEP YOU SOBER!!!  This may seem like an ironic statement to read on a website that is focused on giving you recovery information, but it is the bottom line.  Obviously I think information is an important part of the recovery process, but it is not enough.

The facts and figures of addiction are nice to know and a few more reasons that your addiction is destructive to your life and the lives of those around you are always interesting.  The problem is that there are many people who know all of these things in detail that are trapped in various addictions at this moment with a brain full of all of those facts and figures.

In some cases all of this information is more of a source of self-pity.  If the information alone is what is offered to a person deeply held by the shackles of addiction every piece of information becomes more fuel to the fires of mental torture.

The point is that the information is only fuel.  The information either fuels the fires of mental torture or fuel that ignites and maintains the fires of change and action towards that change.

In recovery there are really only two options:

  1. Either you are changed dramatically
  2. or you are basically the same.

To give you an idea of how dramatic of a change I am describing let’s look at what Dr. William D. Silkworth experienced with one of A.A.’s founding members:

He accepted the plan outlined in this book. One year later he called to see me, and I experienced a very strange sensation. I knew the man by name, and partly recognized his features, but there all resemblance ended. From a trembling, despairing, nervous wreck, had emerged a man brimming over with self-reliance and contentment. I talked with him for some time, but was not able to bring myself to feel that I had known him before. To me he was a stranger, and so he left me. A long time has passed with no return to alcohol.  (Alcoholics Anonymous pg xxxi – 4th Edition)

There is a lot more to it, but to break it down as basically as possible:  THE INFORMATION IS THE FUEL WE ADD TO THE FIRES OF CHANGE.

If you are not dramatically changed by the information, the information has been wasted. 

Do not become one of those people in recovery who know all of the information yet stays the same.  I call those “Zero Steppers.”  Step zero is talking about recovery (but not actually doing any recovery).  So, do not be a “Zero Stepper!”

In the passage we started with from page 7, Bill W. received an overload of recovery information and knowledge that made it all make sense.  All of the details and intricacies of people like us. 

In another story in the book the whole experience is described like this:

Above all, he believed he had acquired such a profound knowledge of the inner workings of his mind and its hidden springs that relapse was unthinkable. Nevertheless, he was drunk in a short time. More baffling still, he could give himself no satisfactory explanation for his fall.  (Alcoholics Anonymous pg 26)

It is unreasonable to thing that gaining information that makes sense is the cure for an activity where you do something that makes no sense for absolutely no sensible reason.  It was never a necessity for your addiction to make sense before, what makes us think that making sense was the problem.  In fact, to some degree you already knew that your addiction makes no sense and were still doing it.

You must be different from the inside out.  Either you are the same or you are dramatically different.  That is it! 

The knowing is useless if it is not fuel for changing!